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25.3.13

A Survey of Dvořák Symphony Cycles



Like the Beethoven Piano Sonata Cycle Survey, the Bach Organ Cycle Survey, the Sibelius Symphony Cycle Survey, and the Bruckner Cycle Survey, this is a mere inventory of what has been recorded and whether it is still available. Favorites are denoted with the “ionarts’ choice” graphic.


The complete Dvořák Symphonies have gone through various changes in their numbering (best known is the fact that the Ninth Symphony used to be considered the "Fifth" (and Five was Three, Six was One…), since Dvořák had suppressed the first four. Those four are incidentally the real reason to get a complete set. (This is assuming you already have a Fifth, Sixth [something better than this one], and definitely assuming you have a Seventh and Eighth; if you don't have a Ninth, you stumbled upon the wrong website.) Dvořák might have thought them lesser efforts, and certainly the Second Symphony lacks conciseness and the veteran punch that the composer can deliver in the darkly grand, consciously ambitious Seventh, or the even-keeled, mature, charming Fifth with its Bohemian touch. Dvořák’s Third is “Wagner without Words” and terrific, too... you get the picture.

There’s plenty of choice out there, albeit less than with Sibelius or Bruckner. The big names—Kubelik and Kertész in this repertoire—are good, but not necessary beyond criticism. Not every recording that is Czech is therefore idiomatic; nor every non-Czech recording at a disadvantage… and sometimes little underdogs (like Anguélov and his provincial Slovak Radio band, which has also recorded for Naxos with Stephen Gunzenhauser) can take a bite out of the big boys.

Because I’ve not heard even half of the recordings I am very conservative with the “ionarts’ choice” recommendation… a recommendation for which superb treatment of the early symphonies is a prerequisite.

Not included in this list are: an as-of-yet unfinished second cycle by Zdeněk Mácal with the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra on Exton which, when it is completed and if it were readily available, would be the only cycle on SACDs. Ditto the ongoing, promising cycle that José Serebrier is recording on Warner with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.






2 comments:

Thomas at My Porch said...

I've heard bits and pieces of many of these but my favorite is the Jarvi SNO set. I love acoustic of the recording space. Makes everything sound so alive.

Matt said...

Jarvi is not known for his Dvorak, but I've enjoyed his cycle too. His second and eighth are especially fine--I never understood the second until I heard Jarvi.

I thought Ionarts readers might also be interested in the new cycle that Decca released this past week in the US--the Czech Phil conducted by Jiri Belohlavek. I've listened to the set and enjoyed it very much. Not hot-blooded like Szell, but full of lyricism and color. It includes the concertos and feature's Alisa Weilersteins recent cello concerto performance. Here's the link:

http://www.amazon.com/Dvorák-Complete-Symphonies-Concertos-digital/dp/B00M3GBXKK/ref=sr_1_1?s=dmusic&ie=UTF8&qid=1407681195&sr=1-1&keywords=belohlavek+dvorak

There's also an ongoing cycle to keep your "eye on", from Jose Serebrier and Bournemouth on the Warner Classics label. I've read some reviews which have been lukewarm, but I've really enjoyed the second, third, and sixth. A new installment will be released next month--I think they have three more to go to complete the cycle and qualify to be listed here. Here's the link:

http://www.amazon.com/Dvorak-Symphony-No-Complete-Legends/dp/B00KYMJ4N8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1407681692&sr=8-3&keywords=serebrier+dvorak