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16.1.11

In Brief: MLK Edition

Here is your regular Sunday selection of links to good things in Blogville and Beyond.
  • Franz Liszt was born in 1811, which makes the year to come a bicentenary one. Thierry Hilleriteau has an appreciation, with comments from French pianist Roger Muraro, who has just released a recording of Liszt's transcription of Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique. [Le Figaro]

  • In what must be another of the inevitable signs that classical music is dead, New York concert presenters are cutting back big-time. We suspect the same is true in Washington, too. [WQXR]

  • Hooray, the rotting corpse of classical music is in good company. Rock music is also dead! [The Guardian]

  • In related news, jazz isn't dead anymore! [New York Times]

  • Never mind: jazz is dead after all. [Los Angeles Times]

  • Marie-Aude Roux went to the Théâtre du Capitole in Toulouse to review a rare French production of Prokofiev's Betrothal in a Monastery in Russian. [Le Monde]

  • According to a new study, Washington is America's Most Literate City. Suck it, San Francisco (#6), Boston (#12), and New York (#26)! [Central Connecticut State University]

  • In bad news for Washington's hopes for the survey next year, I have read none of the books that were on the New York Times bestseller lists the week that I was born. I will never catch up! [Bookslut]

1 comment:

jfl said...

Given the reader comments on the WQXR story, the subtitle might as well be: "With friends like these, who needs enemies."

As if taxidermism was the way to keep classical music alive (rather then 'preserve' it).